Announcing: ReportingOn 2.0 is live

ReportingOn 2.0 is live and ready for your questions. And answers.

It’s still the backchannel for your beat, but it’s an absolute re-imagining of the network.

For those of you who haven’t been keeping score, ReportingOn is a project funded by the Knight News Challenge, and it’s a place for journalists of all stripes to find peers with experience dealing with a particular topic, story, or source.

ReportingOn 2.0 on the morning of launch, July 2, 2009.

(You can catch up with our progress reports from year one and related concepts at the PBS Idea Lab blog.)

The first time out, I built it to be quite Twitter-esque in the hopes that journalists would use it like Twitter, asking questions of their followers and sharing ideas about stories they were working on.

That didn’t happen organically, or if it was going to, it was going to take years. So, with the help of a professional development and design team, we’ve rebuilt the site from the ground up, framed around the act of asking and answering questions.

There’s no 140-character limit, but what you will find are lots of basic features that make sense in this sort of social network.

You can ‘watch’ users, beats, or a particular question, viewing everything in an activity feed that brings you the latest questions and answers from the journalists, topics, and particular issues you’re interested in.

I think you’ll like it.

And, as the grant year for ReportingOn comes to a close, we’re also making the source code for ReportingOn available here under the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 3. You can use that to build your own backchannel question and answer tool for the journalists in your news organization, or even let your readers ask and answer questions.

I want to repeat that and extend it a bit…

Here are four things that could happen next:

  1. ReportingOn.com itself is a stunning success, with thousands of journalists asking and answering great questions every day, finding peers and mentors, improving local news by adding context and insight gleaned from others working similar angles on stories in far-flung locales.
  2. A media company uses ReportingOn’s open-sourced codebase to build their own internal backchannel, probably on an intranet, or requiring authentication so they can limit it to members of their own organization.
  3. A single news organization uses ReportingOn to do the same thing — build an internal backchannel.
  4. A single news organization uses ReportingOn’s open-sourced codebase to build a public tool that allows readers, sources, and reporters to ask and answer questions in a sort of open forum.

What else could you do with ReportingOn? Give it a shot, and let us know.

What’s next for 2.01 and beyond? We’ll let the dust settle over the next few days and figure out which additional features we want to build first, then we’ll take a look at our budget and consider the options. Feel free to check out feedback.reportingon.com to get an idea of where we might go next, and add your own ideas, too!

Thanks to everyone who helped get this launch out the door on time and on budget, especially the Lion Burger development and design team, all the friends and colleagues who gave me their input over the last year, those of you that answered my last-minute call for beta testers, and the Knight Foundation staff for supporting the first year of ReportingOn.

So… Any questions?

4 Replies to “Announcing: ReportingOn 2.0 is live”

  1. The reference to “thousands of journalists asking and answering great questions every day” made me wonder about this … what would you consider an optimum volume of questions for ReportingOn?

    Yahoo Answers, for example, has such an enormous volume of questions that the question you were looking at can be pushed four of five pages down the list in the time it takes for you to answer it. That seems like it’s far too much volume for questions to get seen by the people who need to see them. Similarly, when I post on Web forums, I find that the sites I keep coming back to occupy a sort of “middle ground” in terms of volume … that is, they have enough volume that I can leave, come back 30 minutes later, and find a few new things to read and respond to, but not so much volume that I’ll end up losing entire discussions if I’m away for a day.

    Do you think there’s a “sweet spot” of sorts for ReportingOn’s volume that will result in maximum effectiveness? Is this maybe something that you would try to control by having more and narrower beats if the traffic is high, but fewer and wider beats if it’s not as high?

    1. @Erik –

      There’s no specific number goal in mind, but ideally, every time you check your feed reader or the site, you should see something new.

      Yahoo Answers is so general that I think it suffers — even if I do find something that seems useful there, its credibility, I think, is damaged by its lack of focus.

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